I have a small confession to make: despite being a music lover all my life with vinyl being my medium of choice, I have never owned a record cleaning machine. The first machines I heard of―one of the Nitty Gritties if memory serves, or maybe it was the Keith Monks one―were beyond my financial means in those days, and the thought of hand washing my precious vinyl gave me the willies (to be totally honest, it still does)! So, with the exception of a flirtation with Last Record Preserver, I have never washed my records. I am, however, extremely fastidious with them: I never touch the playing surfaces (handling the record by the label and edge only), I always keep them in anti-static sleeves, and I never lend them to anyone. When I buy used records, I give them a thorough examination to make sure they’re in good condition (or at least, visibly clean).

In the last year or so I started hearing about more affordable alternatives to the vacuum record cleaning machines, and at last year’s RMAF I met Mark Mawhinney, Spin Clean International’s head honcho. Spin Clean has been making record cleaning machines since 1975; when I heard that the base package (consisting of the cleaning machine itself, a pair of brushes, a pair of rollers, two washable drying cloths, and a 4 oz bottle of cleaning fluid) retailed for a very reasonable $80, I had to give the Spin Clean a, err, spin. A month or two later, Mawhinney sent me a package containing the complete Spin Clean Record Washer system. In addition to the base package, the complete system also comes with a 32 oz bottle of cleaning fluid, an extra pair of brushes, and five extra drying cloths. The complete system costs $125, a saving of $25 compared to buying the items separately.

Technical Description

The Spin Clean Record Washer is a deceptively simple contraption consisting of a bright yellow plastic washer basin and lid (as well as screaming “Look at me!”, the yellow case was chosen so that dirt and debris from the records being cleaned would show up more clearly, enabling one to better judge when to change the fluid). In the base are a pair of slots for the felt cleaning brushes, and three pairs of slots for the rollers. The outermost pair of slots is used when cleaning 12” LPs and singles, the middle pair are used when cleaning 10” records (be they 10” singles, EPs, or 78 RPM discs), and the innermost pair are used when cleaning 7” singles.

The rollers are made from plastic with a rubber ring around the centre to provide a better grip on the records being cleaned. The two brushes are covered with felt; because there are two of them, both sides of the record are cleaned simultaneously. Replacement parts and extra bottles of cleaning fluid are available from Spin Clean.

A year or two ago, the Mark 2 version of the Spin Clean was released. This review is of the Mk 2, and there are several differences between it and the original: the basin and lid are stronger and UV resistant; the rollers have been totally redesigned; the brush foam and fabric are improved; the unit has new feet; there’s a new owner’s manual; there are new drying cloths; and finally, the cleaning solution has been improved.

Setup and Listening

I set up the Spin Clean on a towel-covered table, filled the base up to the line with distilled water (the manual states that tap water can be used, but I advise against it; water that’s perfectly fine to drink may contain dissolved solids that you don’t want anywhere near your precious vinyl!), and poured three caps full of the cleaning fluid over the brushes. I selected a few records to test (at least one of each size). In each case I cleaned the record with a carbon fibre brush and played it before cleaning it in the Spin Clean. After cleaning the record I visually inspected it and then re-played it to compare the before and after sound quality.

The cleaning process is simple, if a little tedious after a while: place the record between the two brushes (after putting the rollers in the correct place, of course!) and rotate it clockwise for three or so revolutions; rotate it anti-clockwise for another three or revolutions; carefully remove the record from the cleaner, letting excess water drip back into the base; and very carefully dry the record using one of the towels. Once the record is dry, place it back into its sleeve, or if it’s a new record, replace the sleeve with an anti-static one. At all times, touch only the record’s label and outer edge (especially when rotating it in the Spin Clean: use your palms rather than your fingers). Do not touch the playing surfaces, even the lead-in groove!

Spin Clean suggest that one can clean as many as 50 records with one batch of solution. I recommended changing the fluid more frequently than that, say every 20 to 30 records, depending on how dirty they are. If the water looks dirty at any time, it’s time to change it!

So far so good, but how well does the Spin Clean actually work? To get right to the point, it works very well! Even records that looked pretty clean to the naked eye looked noticeably cleaner after their Spin Clean bath. The effect was even more dramatic on old, not-so-pristine used records: finger prints and smudges left by previous careless owners were removed without a trace!

I could go on for paragraph after paragraph extolling the Spin Clean’s virtues, but I think photographs will do the job far more eloquently than I. Here are a few “before and after” pictures. The first pair is from an old used 7” single, the second pair is from an old used LP, and the final pair is from a brand new LP I’ve owned for just a few weeks.

In this first example, the record’s surface is filthy, looking like a rock-littered moonscape (the red mark is a contaminant impregnated in the vinyl; fortunately it doesn’t effect the playback). Remember, I took the “before” photos after cleaning the record with an anti-static brush and playing it. The picture on the right, taken after a Spin Clean cleaning session speaks for itself. Although the impregnated red stuff is still there, the record’s surface is much cleaner. Upon re-playing it, the record was noticeably quieter too. Prior to cleaning the record sounded like (if you’ll excuse the British metaphor) a chip shop frier, with many tics and pops―exactly the sort of crap that vinyl neophytes have been taught to expect from vinyl. After cleaning, the crackling of the chip shop frier was all but gone, as were most (like, 80% to 90%) of the tics and pops. Unfortunately, this record suffers some groove damage due to the abuse it suffered from its previous owners. No amount of cleaning will help here!

This second example is also littered with dust boulders, but the record also has a big smear that looks like a scuff mark. A few minutes later, after a dip in the Spin Clean, the same section of the record is unrecognisable! The scuff-like smear is all but gone, as is the dust debris field.

As you can see from the final set of pictures, even a brand new record from a well-known audiophile label isn’t completely dust free and benefits from a cleaning session in the Spin Clean.

Apart from the quieter surfaces and blacker backgrounds, I couldn’t really detect any change in the sound quality of cleaned records compared to un-cleaned ones. That said, the reduction of surface noise etc. is a welcome improvement! (Most of my records are free from tics and pops, but a reduction in surface noise―even when one’s records are virtually silent anyway―is always welcome.)

Verdict

Being a manual cleaner, the Spin Clean has the advantage of silent operation, and zero power use. The flip side to this is that cleaning more than a dozen or so records at one time gets old very quickly, and drying my records by hand makes me a little nervous. These caveats notwithstanding, the important question is “Does the Spin Clean Record Washer work?”, and the answer to that is easy: as the preceding photos show, the Spin Clean not only works, it works very well. I don’t doubt that a vacuum record cleaning machine would be less tedious and more efficacious, but the cost difference (at least several hundred dollars) is considerable.

The bottom line is this: the Spin Clean Record Washer easily earns my highest recommendation. If you have any number of records and can’t justify the not insignificant price jump for a vacuum record cleaning machine, you need one of these.

It may be surprising to some; but believe it or not cd sales are declining, while vinyl records are seeing a revival. In 2009 Nielsen Soundscan found that record sales had increased by 35% throughout the previous year. During the same time period, cd sales dropped by 20%. The recent success of vinyl records can be blamed in part on the fact that there are no anti-piracy restrictions on records as there are with their digital counterparts.  A major reason for the resurgence in record sales is that a lot of consumers believe that records simply sound better than cd’s. Audiophiles, collectors, and DJ’s still swear by records, Obviously Cd’s sound cannot be manipulated manually as with records. DJ techniques such as slip-cueing, beatmatching, and scratching originated on turntables. With CDs or compact audio cassettes one usually has only indirect manipulation options, for example, the play, stop, and pause buttons. With a record one can place the stylus a few grooves farther in or out, accelerate or decelerate the turntable, or even reverse its direction, provided the stylus, record player, and record itself are built to withstand it.

Diehard fans of music and a lot of artists often feel that the vinyl version is the only true version of a release. There are many factors that contribute to this commonly held belief; the scope and presence of the art, the superior sound quality, and most certainly the actual work and involvement that the listener has to put in in order to play the music. Vinyl is the choice format for people that really love and care about actually listening to music. So as CD sales decline and vinyl record sales grow, people are beginning to see that vinyl is coming back with a vengeance. With so many consumers buying vinyl records again, and the amount of people that are downloading all of their music online, it wouldn’t be a surprise to see CD’s off the shelves entirely within the next decade.

With more vinyl collectors and less places selling vinyl records it is getting harder to find rare albums. So many record shops are going out of business, due to the ease and availability of mp3 files. With all this and a poor economy that has sucked the life out of a nationally known local record store. After 30 years Vinyl Fever closed its doors. Known for its knowledgeable staff and extensive, eclectic selection of new and used CDs, vinyl records and related merchandise, Vinyl Fever has drawn customers from across the state and beyond. Vinyl Fever went out with a bang. Owner Lee Wolfson spun his favorite rare records and several bands performed live. Even though it was announced several months ago, customers were still shocked and saddened by the store’s closing. Everything in the store was up for sale; including the famous instruments and posters that had “Not for Sale” signs on them for year’s .A bad economy and a changing industry are some of the reasons why Vinyl Fever closed its doors. Vinyl has become big over the past half decade, and if not for that revival perhaps Vinyl Fever would have bitten the dust earlier.

Do you have a vinyl record collection?  A Spin Clean Record Washer can take care of all your cleaning needs for your vinyl records.  Its secret weapon is its special washer fluid.  This special formula encapsulates the dirt that comes off the record and sinks it to the bottom of the washer basin so it is not re-deposited back on to your valuable records. Watch the Spin Clean Record Washer video in action!

More than 8,000 records were found hidden between a narrow 16-inch wall space

Thousands of pieces of history was discovered at the ‘Old Madigan Hospital’ complex during renovation efforts at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington.

Officials say more than 8,000 vinyl records were found hidden between a narrow 16-inch wall space. The vinyl recordings were dated from 1942 to 1960.

They contained popular music and programming recorded by the Armed Forces Radio Service and the War Department.

JBLM Cultural Resources Manager Dale Sadler says, “They’re obviously in great shape. We were lucky they stayed in a heated building you didn’t have the hot, cold warping, water damage, mold, very clean, their all in sleeves with a very complete card catalog.”

The records were provided to military radio stations to inform and entertain service members around the world. It played on the Madigan Hospital radio station (KMAH) for patients at the hospital.

The World War II-era music contained classics from Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Eddie Arnold, and Rosemary Clooney. Jazz great Louis Armstrong tunes received considerable air time, and in 1952 he made a personal visit to the KMAH studios.

The recordings were re-discovered by an employee of Advanced Technology Construction (ATC), who cut into a gym wall to install new wiring.

In the narrow wall space, he found 30 large boxes containing the records.

Even after 70 years finding these records may have been the easy part. Finding a way to play them is more difficult.

After a lot of online searching we found Precision Audio Restoration in Shoreline.

Owner Joe Roeder knows just about all there is to know about every recording medium.

Roeder says, “These are transcription records, 33 or 78 rpm. Oh this is commercially made. You can fit a lot of material on a 16 inch record.”

With the lift of a finger and drop of a needle we listened to a recording of Gene Autry that was first heard seven decades ago.

Dale Sadler says, “Someone must have really loved these records, treasured them enough even though the radio station was going away, you don’t have a player anymore who knows what they thought when they put it away.”

And in doing so preserved them for future generations to enjoy.

JBLM is contacting the United States Library Of Congress for advice about what to do with the records.

Anyone who needs the services of Precisions Audio Restoration can reach them at http://www.precision-ar.com

source: originally posted on http://www.latimes.com/kcpq-historical-recordings-discovered-during-jblm-renovation-efforts-20110208,0,3302708.story

Did you ever think that vinyl records would still be around? Most consumers didn’t think so, especially when CD’s made their appearance. The thought was that CD’s would wipe vinyl records out, but vinyl records kept on playing.

Another big surprise is the number of people between the ages of 20 and 35 that like vinyl records now. While it’s easy to download songs these days, the sound that comes from a vinyl record can’t compare.

Vinyl records can last a long time but they need to be taken care of properly so that the wonderful sound keeps filling the room.

Cleaning vinyl records with the Spin Clean record washer makes it as easy as one, two, three. You just fill it, spin it, and dry it. It enables you to clean both sides of your record at once without using your valuable turntable as the cleaning device. With the Spin Clean record washer system, you’ll add years to all of your equipment including turntables, stylus (needle) and of course your record collection. The secret weapon is its special washer fluid.

Why Go To All That Trouble? We spend so much time taking care of our vinyl records, cleaning them, sorting and cataloging. But truth be told, the reward is the superb sound of the music we get from a well taken care of vinyl record!

Spin Clean Record Washer was Just Named

“The Top 10 Great Audiophile Gifts for 2010” enjoythemusic.com

“One of The Best Products of 2010” in December’s issue of Stereophile Magazine

“Accessory Of The Year” By The Absolute Sound

 

Did you ever think that vinyl records would still be around?  Most consumers didn’t think so, especially when CD’s made their appearance.    The thought was that CD’s would wipe vinyl records out, but vinyl records kept on playing.   

Another big surprise is the number of people between the ages of  20 and 35 that like vinyl records now.  While it’s easy to download songs these days, the sound that comes from a vinyl record can’t compare.  

Vinyl records can last a long time but they need to be taken care of properly so that the wonderful sound keeps filling the room.  

Cleaning vinyl records with the Spin Clean record washer
makes it as easy as one, two, three.  You just fill it, spin it, and dry it.  It enables you to clean both sides of your record at once without using your valuable turntable as the cleaning device.  With the Spin Clean record washer system, you’ll add years to all of your equipment including turntables, stylus (needle) and of course your record collection.  The secret weapon is its special washer fluid.

Why Go To All That Trouble?

We spend so much time taking care of our vinyl records, cleaning them, sorting and cataloging. But truth be told, the reward is the superb sound of the music we get from a well taken care of vinyl record!

Spin Clean Record Washer was Just Named

“The Top 10 Great Audiophile Gifts for 2010” enjoythemusic.com

“One of The Best Products of 2010” in December’s issue of Stereophile Magazine

“Accessory Of The Year” By The Absolute Sound

 

All for the low price of $124.99

What’s included:

  • Washer Basin and Lid
  • Washer Fluid 4oz
  • Washer Fluid 32oz
  • Two Pair Brushes MKII
  • One Pair Rollers MKII
  • Seven Washable Drying Cloths

You save $24.97 plus FREE SHIPPING!

Order Yours now at www.spincleanrecordwasher.com and receive FREE SHIPPING!

 

Spin Clean Record Washer was Just Named

“The Top 10 Great Audiophile Gifts for 2010”  enjoythemusic.com

“One of The Best Products of 2010” in December’s issue of Stereophile Magazine

“Accessory Of The Year” By The Absolute Sound

%d bloggers like this: